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by: Ralphus

This technical tip describes the fitting of an Audiovox Cruise Control with MCCruise CIU to my 2005 FZ1.The main things that you need to be able to do are fabricate brackets for mounting the servo unit, controller and cables, read an electrical circuit and connect wires to the right locations, fit vacuum hoses and check valves, and connect the throttle cable to the carburetors (or throttle bodies if your bike is fuel injected).

Audiovox cruise control units seemed to be the most popular among motorcyclists so I bought one off Ebay for a good price. I recommend getting it sent via normal parcel post it is about half the price and only took a week to deliver from the US.



The first thing I did when I got the unit was weather proof the controller unit. This required prizing off the plastic cover and applying silicone to the rubber membrane to prevent leakage through the switches, I also applied silicone to the rear to prevent leakage through the back. This needs to be done as the controllers are designed for dash panels in cars not motorcycles.



I then made up a bracket to fit it to my left hand mirror. Directly above the switch block is the ideal position ergonomically but I had to raise mine slightly to be able to operate the choke lever. The electrical cables were wrapped in anaconda flex to protect them from rubbing on the forks.



I then programmed the dip switches on the servo unit. I set mine up to work off the pulses from the ignition coil hence the cruise control will attempt to maintain constant RPM. Alternatively, it could be programmed to run off the speed sensor if your bike has an electronic speedo, the cruise control will attempt to run a constant speed in this case no matter what gear you are in (I couldn't get this to work on my bike so I just run off constant RPM without the speed sensor).



DIP Switch Settings for 2005 Yamaha FZ1 without speed sensor

SW1

ON

Set to 4,000 Pulses Per Mile

SW2

OFF

Set to 4,000 Pulses Per Mile

SW3

OFF

Set for Tach only

SW4

ON

Low sensitivity

SW5

OFF

Low sensitivity

SW6

OFF

Control switch is normally open

SW7

ON

Coil is source of timing pulses

Jumper

Remove

For manual transmission

DIP Switch Settings for 2005 Yamaha FZ1 with speed sensor

SW1

ON

Set to 8,000 Pulses Per Mile

SW2

ON

Set to 8,000 Pulses Per Mile

SW3

ON

Set for Vehicle Speed Sensor

SW4

ON

Low sensitivity

SW5

OFF

Low sensitivity

SW6

OFF

Control switch is normally open

SW7

ON

Coil is source of timing pulses

Jumper

Remove

For manual transmission

My next mission was to fit the vacuum servo unit. I chose under the left hand dash panel as it needed the least amount of work, fitted quite neatly and put more weight over the front wheel where you want it. The only drawback with this position is that it is mounted close the voltage regulator, Audiovox recommends mounting at least 1 ft. away because of the possibility of noise signals. I decided to run with this position figuring I could always relocate the regulator if necessary. I painted the mounting bracket to make it blend in with the rest of the bike. I used the regulator bolt holes to mount the servo unit.



Wiring up the cruise control requires cutting metres of cable you don't need. I decided to buy a 6 pin plug and a crimper from the local electronics shop to tidy it all up. Once I had soldered the wire ends, crimped the connectors, fitted the connectors to the plugs and snapped on the scotchlok connectors, I then wrapped and taped all of the wires in anaconda flex to protect the wiring. I took the 12V power source from an unused plug (blue/red wire) next to the left front indicator and then fitted the earth strap to a frame mounting bracket bolt. It is worth doing some multi-meter checks at this stage to confirm all is well electrically. You will need the circuit diagram for the FZ1 to work out which wires to tap into.



The next job was to fit the pull cable to carburetor. I decided to give the bead chain arrangement in the kit a big miss and buy a cable interface unit (CIU) from www.mccruise.com. Frank from mccruise was very helpful with advice on how to setup the CIU to work with the Audiovox cruise control. There were a few reasons why I decided to do this: beadchains take up a lot of space, require special brackets to be fabricated that can make synchronizing carbies difficult, can jam up the carbies, need to have their travel carefully matched to the throttle travel on the motorcycle and would take a lot longer to fit up. The CIU is a much better concept as it addresses all of these issues. I would definitely recommend fitting up a CIU to any inline multi-cylinder bike. The basic principle of the CIU is explained in the diagrams below. This is a patented design so don't copy it, instead buy one off www.mccruise.com. Several members of the FZ1OA have fitted these Audiovox units without a CIU but for all the effort involved and potential safety issues I personally think that buying a CIU is well worth the extra money. BTW www.mccruise.com sell a universal electronic cruise control unit that is specifically designed for motorcycles and superior to the Audiovox units but costs about twice as much.



This required the carbies to be removed from the engine (see Pat's instructions on carby removal). Frank from Motor Cycle Setup has a special tool that enables you to do the job without pulling the carbies (he didn't have one he could loan me at the time). The threaded section on the cruise control cable also needs to be shortened 8mm to match the CIU. This is easily done by carefully hacksawing the thread to weaken it and crushing it gently with a pair of pliers (whatever you do don't damage or cut the cable). Routing of the cables also needs to changed to provide a gentle arc for smooth throttle action. The cables should all be adjusted to provide the normal throttle freeplay and lubed with light oil to give an easy throttle action.







Next was fitting up the vacuum lines from the vacuum ports on the carbies to the servo unit. This was the easiest job of the lot. I removed the blanks from the ports on carbs 2&3, fitted hoses with one way check valves, a tee piece and then connected the hose to the servo unit. This arrangement works well and does not require an additional vacuum canister.



All the fitting and electrical work was now done. Time for testing this baby. Wonders will never cease! Hallelujah! It worked first time with no need to debug my handiwork. It held speed within +/- 1km/h going up hill or down hill. It switched off when the brakes or clutch were applied. The only quirky thing was the clutch disengagement. The computer detects a sudden increase in revs and then turns off the cruise control which I believe can be remedied by hooking a relay into the brake circuit (it doesn't bother me and I couldn't be bothered wasting anymore brain cells trying to figure it out). The cruise control doesn't hold speed above 135km/h, I am not sure why this is the case.

Cost of fitting the cruise control:

Audiovox CCS 100 Cruise Control Unit

$136

Electrical Connectors

$10

Vacuum check valves

$10

Cable Interface Unit & Cable

$164

Total

$320

Was it worthwhile? This is the best mod I have ever done to motorcycle. It works far better than any throttle stop device when it comes to controlling the speed. I use the cruise control a lot because I live in the speed camera capital of the world just ask Cookie!

Note: Cruise controls should not be used in heavy traffic or in environments where a lot of gear changing is necessary eg. Mountain roads.

Disclaimer: This arrangement works well on my motorcycle but I accept no responsibility for any disasters/losses/dramas that may occur as a result of someone trying to replicate this installation on their motorcycle.